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BRUCE MORTIMER
MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTIST

SEARCH and INFORMATION PAGE

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  • What is a "multi-disciplinary" artist?
    Despite loving minimalism and a simple approach, I incorporate so many mediums into my contributions that it's probably the only fair way to describe me. I am still focused and have consistent basic style, creating specific series with their own character, attempting originality using paint mediums, dry mediums such as charcoal, pastel and pencil, sculptural aspects, and I have a serious interest in photography and cinema. I'm also a private and amateur musician. All that after voluntarily leaving a promising career as an earth scientist. I have defended the wisdom of youth ever since.
  • Where are you located?
    I work from a studio in Redwood, Wellington, New Zealand. Long before moving here I had my own gallery but chose many years ago to take the simpler option, and I now treat my online gallery as if I am shop-fitting and curating a physical space, and I hope that my sense of clean and crisp interior design is still tangible! Apart from the undeniable grandeur of the country, we are fortunate here to have an excellent postal and courier system and a very high degree of online trust which has assisted me to work easily with clients from all over the world from this position.
  • Can I purchase directly from this online gallery?
    Yes, click on any artwork and use the "purchase artwork" button. This doesn't apply to work currently held by other galleries, in this case please contact them directly or request that I introduce you to them.
  • Can I arrange to purchase an artwork I've seen here at a physical gallery near me?
    If the work is currently in my possession and the gallery in question is one of those that represent me, then this is an option, although I frequently deliver work in person and so this is probably the preferred option.
  • Where else can I purchase your artwork?
    There are a few select galleries that have my work, and those pieces are also shown here in this gallery, but will indicate in each case which gallery currently holds that piece. You can still enquire about one of those artworks and I will put you in direct touch with the gallery concerned.
  • What payment methods do you accept?
    I accept PayPal, credit card payments, and direct deposits into my bank account. Although on the artwork view page you'll see a dominant PayPal button, this isn't the only option and the other options will be revealed at the time of choosing payment method.
  • How will you deliver my artwork?
    Within New Zealand, I will either send using a reliable transport company (I often use PBT, or CourierPost), or deliver to you in person. Please allow for some time after purchasing to arrange and finalize these logistics. I will keep you informed at all points in the process. For international purchasers there will be an additional cost for sending the artwork. For drawings, paintings on canvas, and single edition photographs, I recommend these be removed from any frames or framing and sent rolled in a double-walled mailing tube for safest and easiest delivery. Re-stretching or framing will then be for your account and at your discretion at your location. Click the button near the top of this page "purchase & delivery details" for more comprehensive instruction.
  • Can I commission an artwork?
    My work is biased towards exhibition originals, but I am always open to special projects that you might have in mind. Please contact me to discuss further, thank you.
  • Why don't I see any prints of your work for sale?
    I like the concept of all work being unique and original. My business is creating artworks that express a moment in my journey and carry that energy forward, not in reproducing products.
  • What is your stance on NFT's?
    NFT's, or Non Fungible Tokens, are much like crypto currencies being both quite recent innovations and dependent on the concept of block chain. They certainly seem to work for some people (both artists and investors), but the advice I have received to date suggests I avoid the concept and make sure my clients get an actual piece of art for their investment.
  • What is your policy on using renewable materials, or materials that don't contribute to environmental issues?
    I increasingly use materials that would have otherwise been discarded for my mixed media work, but beyond that I try to have a moderate approach to what I do, using what I feel suits the artwork best at the time, making something of value and durability, whilst remaining painfully aware of any waste I generate in the process, or impact I might have through personal and business travel and distribution of my artwork.
  • What is your opinion on AI with respect to art?
    Social media is fast becoming one big April fool's joke thanks to a sudden proliferation of AI generated images presented as if they are real. So I think AI undermines what viewers perceive as reality, and hence trust as being reality. I momentarily considered using AI to generate a reference for a photorealistic drawing (I would have still created the final drawing by hand), and then I decided to be the change I want to see in the world and I shall continue to base my art only on scenes I have seen, been influenced by, or exist in my soul.

I have now created art professionally for almost exactly half of my life (since 1995). I have won awards for my art, avoided awards for much more of that time, and largely ignored what anyone else does, aside from a few creative and personal influences.  I had options, and I chose to make art.  I've since worked with some great clients, and I value where that has got me, even if every day feels like I'm starting all over again. You won't find me making prints of my art, or creating what I think you might like.  There are plenty of other sources of those sort of art products, and I prefer to strive for originality in what I do, if achieving that only momentarily and seldom.  Here is a bit of my story and how it relates to what you are looking at.   The value of art is determined by, amongst other factors, its presence (how it commands attention right now) and its provenance (how it came to achieve that). My own journey isn't underpinned by a story borne out of traumatic experiences, but rather out of a positive approach and some inspired choices.  Although I am moving towards my art being less safe (appearing more 'traumatized' itself) it's no surprise that my style is one of simplicity, earthiness and organic in nature, and with positive messages, albeit from the point of view of an introvert often seeking solitude and then shouting their message loudly from there.   Perhaps a unique aspect of art, and artists, is that you cannot separate everyday life, or accumulated skills and experience, from the process of producing your product.  For expression to take place, inspiration must occur, and this inspiration can be derived from any number of places, but most effectively from within.  With this this mind, and cursed with a need to constantly learn new skills, the type that money can't buy, I have applied my passion across many subjects, and these all come together in every piece of art.  It is perhaps a precursor to my art's point of difference, and instrumental in establishing the value of what I do. As some background to how I am inspired, I could be described as a Third Culture Kid, ex-Earth Scientist, amateur (and private) musician, polyglot, practical builder of stuff, and keen outdoor athlete and adventurer. But I'm not sure anyone else would describe me as that, perhaps settling for a single one of those depending on who they are, or 'he appears to be an artist'. Whatever that means.

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4bstract / Bruce Mortimer is best known as an award-winning pencil photorealist using charcoal and graphite and creating artworks of true value in their uniqueness and exquisite technique...

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